Search Blog by Country

Bolivia Ecuador Guatemala Kenya Mexico Nepal Peru General

CHOICE Introduces New Teen Service Program

4 Life-Changing Reasons to Get Your Kids Excited About High School Volunteering/Community Service

High school volunteering and community service have become activities that students are either required to perform at school or church or are looking to participate in to have their college applications stand out among their peers.

Both parents and kids ask themselves a few simple questions when prioritizing a student’s activity: Why do community service? Will it be useful for the future? Is it fun? Volunteer service in recent years has become much more than selling baked treats at a fundraising table during school lunch.

Read more
1 reaction Share

I will Finally Have Water in my House

In the Bolivian altiplano, at dusk, you can hear the sound of the wind, similar to the sound that emits the melancholic quena of the indigenous Aymara that inhabits these lands inherited from their predecessors that in their customs mixed their rituals with blood and the colonialist imposition. In Chacoma Alta, a community between mountains and high plateaus lives a hard-working, sacrificial woman who has lived all her life looking for places to supply water to her family, she tells us her life in this way.
My name is Emiliana Limachi Flores I live in the community of Chacoma Alta since I married Pablo Sirpa Atahuachi. I was born in the community of Jekeri on August 5, 1943. I have 7 children. 1 woman named Yola Sirpa and I also have 6 sons: Mateo, Gregorio, Samuel, Policarpio, Jose and Felix Sirpa.

Read more
Add your reaction Share

The More I See, the Less I Know

As an educated woman who has been involved in the social good movement for the last 25 years, I sometimes have the illusion that I know how things work in the world.

But it has become very clear to me that the more I see the less I know. I have traveled the world and have seen some incredible human achievements like aqueducts, the Inca ruins of Machu Picchu, and the Roman Colosseum. I have also traveled to rural areas of developing countries and seen first hand what it’s like to live in extreme poverty.

 

Read more
Add your reaction Share

This Young Woman Wants an Education ....Period.

dfg-logo.png

We partner with Days for Girls International to empower young women to stay in school to better serve their future. Jemimah Ngowa is a standard eight pupil at Mwaruphesa Primary school in Kenya. She says, “thank you for the kit. They have helped me so much. Since I got the Days for Girls kits, I have not missed school because of (Aunt Flow) monthly periods and as a result, my performance has improved from below 250 out of 500 to 316 out of 500. Now I am able to concentrate because am equipped with the tools which will help me stay in school. It used to be a challenge to buy sanitary towels because of a lack of money.  Currently am about to sit for my final examination in grade eight and I am very confident that will perform well and join the best high school in the county.”

Read more
Add your reaction Share

Finally Able to Provide Education to their Family

Paula Pavón, an enterprising woman of 34 years and her husband Fernando Proaño of 37 years old have three children and live in rural Ecuador.

Paula and Fernando married young and from the beginning, they had to work very hard to support their family. Without a sufficient education, Fernando had to go out to work as a bricklayer. When construction work was scarce, he performed small jobs as an electrician. Paula was dedicated to the care of her home and sometimes did secretarial work. 

Read more
Add your reaction Share

Health & Nutrition - a critical step in ending poverty

Life can be hard for people living on the Andean Plateau. The altitude is high, vegetation is sparse, and growing food can be difficult. These conditions can naturally lead to situations where people are undernourished, and essential nutrition is a critical step in breaking the cycle of malnutrition and poverty.

Read more
Add your reaction Share

Native Leaders Lifting Their Villages

How CHOICE leaders are making change happen in their communities.

CHOICE Humanitarian’s mission is to end extreme poverty. That mission couldn’t be accomplished without the volunteers who dedicate their time and energy to making the world a better place—one village at a time. At every level of the organization—from our home office to the villages around the world—there are leaders and volunteers hard at work combating poverty.

One of those leaders is Pascal Karisa, a CHOICE Humanitarian native leader who’s making a big difference in his community in the Samburu District in Kenya.

Read more
Add your reaction Share

My Business Gives Me a Voice

Harka is 51 years old and is from Lamjung, Nepal. He was born into a Dalit family. Dalit is a marginalized caste, inheriting desperate poverty and discrimination. His voice was rarely heard in the community.

Read more
Add your reaction Share

What Does Extreme Poverty Look Like?

Stories on poverty are fairly common in the press. Generally, they describe those living in poverty as having very little or no money or material possessions. It’s a pretty vague concept which makes it difficult for those of us living in relative prosperity to truly understand. The concept of poverty is further clouded by single statistics—the World Bank classifies those around the world who live on less than $1.90 per day live in extreme poverty. That’s right; extreme poverty is a thing. But that kind of number is simply too hard for many people to wrap their mind around. 

So, what does it look like then, to live life in extreme poverty?  

Read more
Add your reaction Share

A Dangerous Walk

The community of Tzuncoc is in rural Guatemala, and here students must cross a river to get to primary school. Some students walk as much as 1.5 hours a day to school, and several accidents have resulted when students have tried to cross the river.

Read more
Add your reaction Share

Let us help you