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Poverty Eradication is no Friend of Gender Equity

18125366562_b7cedb3a88_z-480x198.jpgWhy is gender equity in impoverished communities so important? Because extreme poverty is sexist! Women in poor communities bear almost the entire responsibility for providing the basic needs for their families, yet are largely left without resources, freedom, and decision-making power required to fulfill these needs. CHOICE Humanitarian is committed to programs that empower women to take an active and equal role in community-level leadership that can break the cycle of poverty.

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Focusing on the Future in Nepal

18124875592_e38d307c6e_z-640x198.jpgCHOICE has been working for 33 years with people who live on less than $1.25 a day helping them create their own path out of poverty. CHOICE has been working in remote villages in Nepal for over 15 years. Currently, we are working on a program called Nepal LIFE that will help Nepal to become the first developing country in the world to end extreme poverty. We are based in the Lamjung District, the epicenter of the deadly quake, where we work in 180 villages. Many of these rural areas have not been accessed for any earthquake relief. Those that have, paint a desperate picture.

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Savings Box Program

16638825067_f364c104a1_k-940x198.jpgAccording to the United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization (UNESCO), education that is both relevant and purposeful has the power to transform lives.

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Nepal Earthquake Update 5/8

IMG_4320-480x198.jpgSituation Analysis: Nepal Earthquake and Response

A: SLOW GOVERNMENT RESPONSE AT THE BEGINNING

In complaining the government response, however, one must guard against terminal cynicism. Let us try and keep some perspective-this is polity that has barely gotten back on the democratic rails, after the November 2013 elections.

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Nepal Earthquake Update 4/28

The following is an update directly from Kiran, our senior staff member on the ground in Lamjung area:

“I feel very happy and blessed to be able to say that we are safe even in this tragic moment. I am in Besishahar today. This is the first day I got access to the internet after the earthquake.

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Nepal Earthquake Update 4/27

15227823479_e5356093b4_z-640x198.jpgWhen we last spoke with Bishnu this morning, he was in good spirits and ready to tackle the day. Today he will be meeting with the Red Cross of Nepal and begin coordination on relief efforts to be mounted and where to focus.

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Nepal Earthquake Update 4/26

village-940x198.jpgNepal can be divided into two primary groups of people in need, those living in the Kathmandu Valley and those living in the remote mountainous regions that are inaccessible by any means other than by foot or helicopter.

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Nepal Earthquake Update 4/25

10421207_626058170829393_8777656928876523952_n-940x198.jpgToday a massive 7.8 earthquake in Nepal, the worst in 80 years has reduced much of Kathmandu to rubble. In addition, there have been 43 aftershocks in the last 8 hours with more likely to come.

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Rise Above Bolivia

Bolovian-elderly3-640x198.jpgJaede is 18 years old. She was born and raised in Utah, but she is Bolivian. When she was younger, she traveled to the small town of Villa Serrano in Bolivia where she became keenly aware of the need for a facility for the elderly, many of which are homeless.

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Metal Stoves in Nepal

IMG_1611-940x198.jpgKirti Gurung lives in Karapu, a mountainous village of the Lamjung district in Nepal. Her husband Hom works in the Gulf countries as a laborer, barely making enough to meet the family’s daily expenses. He is one of 3.5 million Nepalese enduring very poor working conditions in order to ensure their family’s survival. He visits his family once every two years.

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